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How Do You Wine

By Miriam Landru

Even if you’re a newbie to the world of wine, you are probably familiar with the fact that different glasses go with different wines. 

A glass for your merlot will generally be taller and have a larger bottom, while the vessel for your Pinot Grigio will be more petite.

Wine lovers are not only drinking out of the standard crystal anymore. Plastic wine glasses are a mainstay in the homes of even the most discerning grape nuts. And these are not just dollar store finds. Companies like govino demand $20 or more for sets of their unbreakable ware.

If you enjoy a cool rosé on the beach, you can even find wine glasses in insulated tumblers. But, it’s autumn and maybe a coastal Chardonnay isn’t on your mind anymore. In that case, you can also find a durable plastic glass to take fireside on your next camping adventure. 

Still, you may just enjoy some Netflix and chill time indoors with your most robust Cabernet Sauvignon. And if that’s the case… It’s time to give you a prescription of what types of wine glasses will suit your needs.

The Wine RX

Red Wines  For the red lovers, there are two main glasses that vinos swear by. Those are the Bordeaux glass and the Burgundy glass.

The Bordeaux is taller and is designed for heavy bodied wines like Merlots. The tallness allows the wine to travel immediately to the back of the throat for the best flavor.

The Burgundy glass is designed for lighter reds such as an Argentinian Malbec. Since the bowl of this particular glass is larger, it allows the wine to be initially tasted by the tongue.

White Wines  These glasses contain more upright bowls which also allow for a cooler temperature. The glasses are skinnier and taller which allow for the wine to be dispersed throughout the mouth for a fuller flavor. 

Ravishing Red Wines

Beaujolais

Bordeaux

Burgundy

Cabernet Sauvignon

Chianti

Malbec

Merlot

Pinot Noir

Shiraz

Zinfandel

Winning White Wines

Chardonnay

Chenin Blanc

Moscato

Pinot Grigio

Riesling

Sauvignon Blanc